Caspase-1, but Not Caspase-3, Promotes Diabetic Nephropathy.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

J Am Soc Nephrol, Volume 27, Issue 8, p.2270-5 (2016)

Keywords:

Animals, Caspase 1, Caspase 3, Diabetic Nephropathies, Inflammasomes, Mice

Abstract:

Glomerular apoptosis may contribute to diabetic nephropathy (dNP), but the pathophysiologic relevance of this process remains obscure. Here, we administered two partially disjunct polycaspase inhibitors in 8-week-old diabetic (db/db) mice: M-920 (inhibiting caspase-1, -3, -4, -5, -6, -7, and -8) and CIX (inhibiting caspase-3, -6, -7, -8, and -10). Notably, despite reduction in glomerular cell death and caspase-3 activity by both inhibitors, only M-920 ameliorated dNP. Nephroprotection by M-920 was associated with reduced renal caspase-1 and inflammasome activity. Accordingly, analysis of gene expression data in the Nephromine database revealed persistently elevated glomerular expression of inflammasome markers (NLRP3, CASP1, PYCARD, IL-18, IL-1β), but not of apoptosis markers (CASP3, CASP7, PARP1), in patients with and murine models of dNP. In vitro, increased levels of markers of inflammasome activation (Nlrp3, caspase-1 cleavage) preceded those of markers of apoptosis activation (caspase-3 and -7, PARP1 cleavage) in glucose-stressed podocytes. Finally, caspase-3 deficiency did not protect mice from dNP, whereas both homozygous and hemizygous caspase-1 deficiency did. Hence, these results suggest caspase-3-dependent cell death has a negligible effect, whereas caspase-1-dependent inflammasome activation has a crucial function in the establishment of dNP. Furthermore, small molecules targeting caspase-1 or inflammasome activation may be a feasible therapeutic approach in dNP.